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Tips to Fight Jet Lag

When you are on an airplane, you are often going long distances. The distance plus the change in time when you arrive might often lead you to what is most commonly known as jet lag. This is your body's attempt to figure out what has happened and to regulate how you feel, suddenly being in another time zone and in another place.

There are several things that you can do to avoid and to fight jet lag:

Set Your Watch To Local Time
As soon as you get on the airplane, set your watch to the time that it is in the destination to which you are flying. This way, your brain will begin to be accustomed to the new time zone and will be more likely to accept it when you land.

Got to Sleep Or Stay Awake
Next, take careful note of the time that it is where you are landing, and do what you would be doing if you were there. For instance, if you get on a flight in the afternoon where you live, but you are going somewhere that is several hours ahead of you, and therefore where it is currently bed time, you should try to sleep on the plane. The sooner that you can get into the mindset of the current time where you are flying, the better off you will be. A lot of the jet lag problems come from your own mind, so as much as you can convince yourself that the time has changed before you land, the better off you will be.

Stay hydrated
Next, you should stay hydrated on the flight and avoid alcohol. As much rest as you can get on the flight is going to help you greatly. After you have arrived, there are several things that you can do to help yourself get over jet lag as fast as possible.

Stick To The Local Timetable
The most important thing to keep in mind is that as soon as you get to your destination, you should be on the timetable. Try to ignore your own body for a few days. Sleep when the clock says you should be sleeping, and stay awake if it isn't time to be asleep. You might be very tired for a couple of days, but staying on the clock of the place that you have arrived at is the best way to get over jet lag and to be able to enjoy your holiday. Try to avoid the temptation to sleep whenever you feel like it, and stay on a schedule instead!




Source by Travel Guru

Bahamas Taxi Rates Rules & Regulations -bahamas Activities

Under the Bahamas Road Traffic Act , there are five basic types of Public Transport Vehicles.

1. Taxis
2. Tour Cars
3. Livery Cars
4. Self Drive Cars and Scooters
5. Omnibuses: (a) Public Service Omnibuses
(b) Private Schedule Services Omnibuses
(c) Privately Chartered Services Omnibuses

Taxis

Taxis are licensed for a maximum of 12 persons and may ply for hire at any place in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Taxis may be either cars or minibuses and those operating in Grand Bahama and New Providence are required to have working meters. The fares are set by the Government of The Bahamas. The current fare are levels for New Providence, Grand Bahama and the Family Islands was approved in July 2001.

General Rate: For one to two passengers, the frist 1/4 miles is $3.00. Each additional 1/4 mile is 40 cents. Additional passengers after the first two pay $ 3 per person. No charge for accompanied children under the age of five (5) Zone Rate: Zone rates can be applied to most standard routes on request. These rates are also set by the Government of the Bahamas. They apply to one or two passengers. For each additional passenger,add $3.00

Between Sir Lynden Pindling International Airport (Nassau Intern Airport) and

Cable Beach..............................$15
Downtown.................................$22
Paradise Island...........................$27
South Ocean..............................$17
Montagu Forshore......................$29

Between Cable Beach and:
Downtown................................$12
Paradise Island..........................$17
South Ocean.............................$23

Between Paradise Island and Downtown...... $8.00
A bridge toll is added for routes to Paradise Island and is normally $1- $2 depending on the size of Vechicle that you are traveling in.

Waiting Charge:
Having a taxi wait on you will cost 30 cents per minute.

Baggage Charge: There is no charge for up to two pieces of hand baggage, plus small bags and package carried by each passenger. (a)Each additional piece of regular-sized luggage, 75 cents.
(b)Large duffel bags and boxes $1.00

Tour Cars

Like Taxis, Tour Cars are restricted to 12 passengers and may be either car or minibus. However, they should only be used on a prearranged basis for the carriage of groups, either one tours or for transportations purposes.Tour cars may be hired for sightseeing at $45 per hour, ( Five or fewer persons). For each additional 1/2 hour or part thereof, $22.50, Large cars, $60.00 per hour (up to twelve persons), $30.00 for each additional 1/2 hour.

Livery Cars

Livery Cars are found in New Providence and Grand Bahama. They are pre-booked chauffeur driven cars, rented by the hour or day, and are not permitted to ply for hire.

Self Drive Cars and Scooters:
Self drive Cars and Scooters are rental vehicles.

Omni Buss
There are three categories of Omni Buses

(a) Public Schedule Service Omni Bus - commonly called Jitneys, These are licensed for carriage of individual fares between two points on a set route. The fares range from $1.00 - $2.00. Senior citizens, Pensioners and disabled persons pay 50 cents. Children under 3 years are free

(b) Private Schedule Omni Bus - Used mainly for conveyance of groups such as hotel staff, school children, lodge groups, etc, who move from different locations at schedule times.

(c) Private Chartered Services Omni Bus - Used for conveyance of charter groups on sight seeing tours by charter arrangements occasionally used in place of Tour Cars

According to recent survey done on the Islands of New Providence, Eleuthera and Grand Bahama, Taxis and Jitneys are frequently owner driven. Their operations is thus economic base for a large number of families in the Islands .




Source by Bennett Allan

How to get the Best Stateroom on a Cruise Ship

Pimp Up My Stateroom Selection, please...

How to Choose the Best Category

How to Choose the Best Location

How to Get Free Upgrades

How to choose the best category -

Stateroom fundamentals are easily mastered by simply answering the following questions truthfully and to the best of your predictive ability.

1. Are you the party-all-night-every-night type and tend to get up at the crack of noon each day?

2. Are you allergic to sunlight?

3. Are you a vampire?

4. Is your idea of fun curling up with a good book or in-room movie and ordering room service?

5. Are you a shutter bug who just has to jump up and take a hundred pictures of every sunrise, sunset and seagull - even at 3am in a Norwegian Fjord?

6. Do you find it intoxicating to have fresh sea breezes blowing across your bed during the night - or does your spouse's snoring satisfy that need?

7. Do you enjoy sunlight and expansive vistas - but the very idea of fresh air makes you nauseous?

8. Do you want your own private escape route in case of flooding, fire or Somali pirates?

If you answered "Yes" to questions 1, 2 & 3 - then best to save your money on the more expensive cabins and go for the least expensive inside cabin (a cabin on the interior of the ship, having no window, porthole or balcony - but definitely a door - one door - you'll want at least one door for coming and going from your cabin).

If you answered "Yes" to questions 4 & 7 - your best bet will be an Ocean View cabin - one with a window or porthole.

If you answered "Yes" to questions 5, 6 & 8 - you will want a Private Balcony Cabin - or sometimes referred to as a Veranda Cabin.

In spite of the fact that the cruise line will attempt to confuse you with 47 different room categories on any one ship - there are really only a total of five - Penthouses, Suites, Balcony or Veranda Cabins, Ocean View and Inside. The additional category distinctions are really just a function of location within the ship - not size or amenities.

Penthouses- and top end Penthouses called "Owner's Suites" - can be from 900 to 3,000 square feet in size. Almost always with a private balcony or two - they are located on the top most decks of the ship. There are usually only a handful of these type of staterooms on the ship - a half dozen, max.

Suites - a bathroom, bedroom area and separate sitting area usually offering 50 to 150 square feet more space than a Veranda cabin and with a larger than normal private balcony.

Veranda or Balcony Staterooms - pretty much the same as Ocean View staterooms only slightly larger and with a private balcony/veranda - one just big enough for a couple of small plastic chairs and a cocktail table.

Ocean View - just what it says - a stateroom with a window or port hole - neither of which can be opened.

Inside Cabin - a cabin that, due to it's location in the interior section of the ship, does not offer a window, porthole or balcony.

Hot Tip #1 - When attempting to save money by stuffing four or five people in a stateroom- just remember, you will all be using the same bathroom. Thus, the money saved may not be worth the aggravation if you are traveling with teenagers and/or high maintenance women.

How to choose the best location -

"Location, location, location" is the mantra of real estate agents on shore. But to cruise passengers, it is not that big of a deal.

All cabins within any random category tend to be the same size with the same amenities regardless of placement within the ship. The perceived value among the cruise buying public is that the higher up in the ship the more desirable, hence the more valuable the cabin. The cruise lines take full advantage of this misconception via premium pricing for cabins on the upper decks. But here's the skinny. If it is stability you want you should get a cabin as close to dead center of the ship as possible - not too high up, not too low down, not to close to the bow (the pointy end) or stern (the rounded end). Cabins in this Middle Kingdom area will experience less motion.

Additionally, take a close look at the schematic diagrams of each deck - found in brochures as well as online. Look for proximity to elevators, the dining room, the pool deck, the main lobby and late night venues such as the disco. Closeness to these facilities may or may not be desirable depending on your mobility, tolerance for noise, desire to be close to most frequented services and activities, etc.

Hot Tip #2 - If you go to bed at a reasonable hour, watch out for cabins next to elevators or late evening venues such as the disco - it can be very noisy late into the night.

How to get free upgrades -

Here are the two magic words - whip them on your cruise agent - say you want a "Category Guarantee". Just like airlines who over-book flights - cruise lines will frequently over book certain cabin categories. Therefore, they will often reward flexible passengers with a "category guarantee". This simply means that - at time of reservation - if you are willing to forego immediate confirmation of a particular cabin - the cruise line will guarantee a cabin in the category that you have reserved or higher. Often this will lead to an upgrade to the next higher category at no additional cost. Unless you need a stateroom in close proximity to friends or family members; accepting a category guarantee is always worth the gamble - at least in our experience.

Being part of a group or availing one's self of a special promotion can often get an upgrade of one or two categories. (see Pimp My Cruise Fare...especially  the section on How to Read a Cruise Ad)

Lastly, it is a rare occurrence - but never let any opportunity go unexploited. If the cruise line reservations department messes up your booking for one reason or another - no matter how small - respond with kindness and sympathy in your heart - saying something to the effect "We understand and forgive you and hold no grudges...but how about a free upgrade as compensation, Fumble Fingers!"

New article coming soon...travel insurance: Good Deal or Ripoff?




Source by Lyn Cathey

Maximize Ice Retention with Yeti Coolers

The fundamental purpose for using an ice chest, or cooler, is to extend the life of perishable items and goods with ice to ensure their consumption at any given time. The performance of an ice cooler is vital for any camping trip, road trip, or picnic, and does not always provide adequate capacity or ice retention. Unfortunately, not all coolers are created equal. Some are made of styrofoam or plastic and built to fulfill only the basic requirements of a casual user. In fact, the majority of coolers on the market leave much to be desired for anyone looking for one that does what it should do best: maximize the retention of ice. Yeti Coolers are very strong and tough coolers that are known for their superior quality and bear-resistant durability. But another benefit that sets them apart from the rest of the industry is their outstanding thermal properties.

Yeti coolers are among the best insulated coolers on the market, with a full 2" or more of polyurethane insulation in the walls and lid at most sizes. Yeti also sports a freezer quality sealing gasket and one piece construction that gives them industry-leading ice retention. Yeti has designed the optimal ice cooler for any trip or picnic, ensuring the maximum ice retention available. However, this isn't a one-way relationship. There are several tips you can execute to maximize the performance of your cooler.

The art of insulation works both ways, retaining heat as well as cold. For this reason, you should always store your cooler in a cool environment before loading it with ice. If stored directly in the sun or in a hot environment, nature will win and the ice will melt. In extreme cases, people pre-chill their coolers in freezers. The temperature of the ice is also crucial. The colder the ice is when it is loaded in the cooler, the longer the ice will last. Another solution that is often overlooked is the chilling or freezing of food, prior to loading up the cooler. Warm or room temperature food requires more energy to cool and will melt the ice faster, no matter how insulated the cooler is.

The amount of ice used is also important, the more the better. Large pockets of air in the cooler will cause the ice to melt faster. If you are concerned about the weight, you can use towels or newspaper to fill the voids of air. Surface area to volume of the ice also affects melting speed. Block ice will melt much slower, but smaller pieces of ice chill the cooler faster. The ideal situation is to cover the bottom of the cooler with a block of ice, then put the food in and fill in the rest of the space with cube ice. Once the cooler is being used, do not empty out any of the cold water. The cold water will only help insulate the remaining ice and items. If you are still having trouble with ice melt, look into using dry ice, which has a longer life span.

There are various other factors that can affect ice retention: how often you open the lid, storage location, weather, and other environmental variables. Ice coolers are an important dynamic of any trip away from the comforts of society. If you pay careful attention to these extra steps in maximizing ice retention, and take advantage of the thermal properties of Yeti coolers, you will be the envy of any trip or picnic.




Source by Fredericks

Sea Fishing – Mind Boggling Bait Clips

There are many bait clips on the market. Everyone including myself seems to be asked which is the best bait clip and what makes it different from the rest. Well in this article I will go through the pros and cons of bait clips and how they may improve your fishing.

What is a bait clip?

A bait clip is a device that allows you to clip down your snoods or trace lines on your rigs thus reducing the risk of tangles and also to present baits effectively at distance. The use without a bait clip can result in your bait being thrown off the hook during a power cast or even worse hitting the water's surface and coming off the hook without realising and then you sit there watching your rod tip for bites thinking the bait is presented nicely on the bottom when in fact it's been eaten ages ago by a school of Bass. Anglers refer the use of a bait clip to a distance rig; by clipping down the trace and bait it makes your rig more aerodynamic thus giving you a better distance when casting out.

Main design types on the market

Breakaway Impact Shield

A simple hook over system which physically ejects the baited hook on impact with the water. The cone shaped cap above the hook acts as a windshield to protect your bait from being broken apart by the rapidly passing stream of air during a cast.

Breakaway Imp (Imp2)
Miniature combination impact bait clip which works in conjunction with a fast link Easy to use with fool-proof hook release, excellent in flight stability and offers bait protection during the cast. They can be used with any type of sinker.

Gemini Alpha Bait Clip

A streamlined, releasable bait clip, that has the advantageous option of the one slider holding and reliably releasing one or two bait clips, or placing two single clips in line for larger baits.

Breakaway Relay Clips

A neat plastic bait clip which is fitted on to the trace line preventing it from accidently pulling out of the rig tubing also this clip is very adjustable.

Breakaway Impact Lead
A combined lead and bait clip system. Very well designed as a streamlined lead which allows you to create a streamlined rig in seconds by securing the baited hook so that good casting distances can be achieved. As soon as the lead hits the water the coloured plastic tip is forced upwards releasing the hook so that the rig is free to fall into its intended formation in the water.

So which one do I use?

To start they are all priced differently with the relay clip being the cheapest and the Imps & Impact Leads being the most expensive. Most Anglers would of heard or be using the Breakaway Impact Shield bait clip for years as it is the market leader for simplicity and effectiveness. However since then there have been new designs brought to the table allowing us the angler a spoilt choice of bait clips to try out. Here are some pointers to look at: Cost, Effectiveness, Set up time and how well they suit your needs whilst fishing different methods.
The Breakaway Impact Shield can be added to any rig design of your choice with a simple rubber tube holding it in place. Unfortunately it is not the easiest bait clip for large baits at distance and sometimes can fail to unclip if you go down that route. For Sandeel squid and worm baits it's a great all round clip to use and very easy to apply. These clips are used a lot in distance rigs.

Breakaway Imps, these are quite smart, The advantage with these is that there is no need to incorporate the clip into your rig design, This clip clips onto a Breakaway Fastlink which connects your rig to your lead weight allowing you to use any sized weight and rig design you wish. Disadvantage with these is that they don't offer as much protection during the cast as the famous Impact Shield.

Gemini Alpha Clips are great for large baits and also multiple hook rigs as they have a nice long wire that sticks out with plenty of space to clip the hooks down. The only thing with the Alpha clip that I found not to my liking is that in the winter when your fingers feel like they are going to drop off or for people who have no patience! This clip can be fiddly to setup and clip down baits.

Breakaway Relay clips are a simple solution to a problem! It's just a clip! They could not be easier to use. They have no mechanism or release system, and can be incorporated into any of your rigs, however because there is no function as such they sometimes can fail to release baits at short distances.
Breakaway Impact Leads are my personal favourite and is the newest clip on the market, this clip very rarely fail to release the hook, they are very streamlined because they are incorporated into the lead, and as with the imps they can be added to any rig to make it clip down. Impact Leads are available in different sizes and types ranging from Grip Lead styles to Flatfish leads. The only problem I have found with these is if you fish a beach that has very coarse sand you may need to clean the sand out from under the cone to stop it jamming before you cast it back out. Otherwise the plastic cone cannot push your hook off the clip on impact. Overall this clip is second to none!

Remember what ever bait clip you decide to use make sure you are comfortable with it and that it does the job. However for all you Impact Shield Anglers out there, why not try something new this year and see if it can improve your fishing, with so many new designs you might just find the cure to your bait clipping problems or needs.




Source by Frazer

How to Tie a Stimulator Dry Fly for Trout

Stimulators are definitely one the most popular "big" flies on trout streams. They are versatile, float well, visible, easy to tie, and can imitate a lot of different things. As soon as Stone Flies or Salmon Flies hatch, Stimulators will be effective and will continue to be right up through the fall. As soon as the Stone and Salmon Flies disappear, the hoppers will be hitting the water. Hopper imitations will work well into the Fall Caddis hatch. With the exception of color variations from river to river and from hatch to hatch, the stimulator will imitate any of these bugs, as well as just looking like a tasty treat floating by.

To watch a step by step video on how to tie a stimulator follow this link: WWW.OnlineFlyFishingGuide.com/Stimulator

Each river has its own variations of color and size of certain bugs that the Stimulator will imitate. As a general rule, below is a list of the colors that are typical for certain bugs and the times of year they are generally present throughout North America.

May-July: Stone / Salmon Flies

These big bugs hatch as soon as the river starts to clear and warm up. They vary in size greatly with good imitations tied on hooks from size 2 (huge) to size 18 (small) for Little Sallies. Stone Flies also vary in color widely depending on the river, so it is wise to check the colors you will need before you go. Most are some variation or combination of gray, brown, orange, tan, and or yellow.

July-September: Hoppers

The hot summer months typically produce smaller aquatic insects than earlier in the year. This however is when land insects attain their full size. Grass Hoppers are something that hungry fish are always looking for as they uncontrollably fly and accidently land on the water where they are helpless. Hoppers vary in size and color, but any good size stimulator pattern in yellow, tan, brown, green, orange, and maybe some red combination will usually bring trout to the surface. Many times though, they are wary, so the fly needs to be fished naturally and with light tippet, as the water is usually low and clear this time of year.

September-November: Fall Caddis

Known by many names such as October, Fall, and Autumn Caddis, it is not hard to figure out when these super-sized caddis are in the rivers. As far as shape goes, Fall Caddis look exactly like any other caddis. But for size, they are much bigger with patterns tied on hook sizes 6-12 being the norm. Regular Caddis can be any color, but the only color you will need for October Caddis is a creamy orange color. A stimulator with an orange body is about as good as it gets when chasing trout in the fall, almost no matter which North American river you are trout fishing. The odd thing about this hatch is that you will not see them emerging out of the water and flying all around like other caddis hatches. Turn over some rocks though or look in the bushes along the bank and you will find them. Just when you think there are none around is when one will scare you by crawling up the back of your neck. When they do fly you know what it is as it will struggle to stay in the air, and then hit the water and release its eggs, hopefully before getting eaten. Anyway, if you plan to be on a trout stream in the fall, be sure to have some orange stimulators in your fly box (yellow will probably work too).

Recipe:
Hook: Daiichi 1260 in size of your choice
Body: Poly Yarn in color of your choice
Head: Poly Yarn in color of your choice
Wing: Natural elk hair or other color
Tail: Natural elk hair or other color
Hackle: Dry fly hackle

Fishing a Stimulator

Stimulators are one of my favorite patterns to fish. They are easy to cast, highly visible, and the fish love them.  Just squirt a little fly floatant on it and you are ready to fish.  I like to fish them in fast water where fish will see them and not have much time to make up their mind as to whether or not it is real.    Usually you can get by with heavier tippet with these than with small imitations.  I typically use 3X or 4X, unless they are being finicky, then I will go a little lighter to 5X tippet.  If I see even one stone fly in the sky throughout the day, I will immediately tie on a Stimulator of some color variation depending on the river.  If there are stone flies on the water, those fish will be looking up, and a big juicy insect is too much to pass up.

Conclusion:

Stimulators are available in just about any fly shop you  will visit as are the materials you will need to tie them.   They are easy and inexpensive to tie and will float on the water like a  boat.  For more information on stimulators  and to watch a video on tying them as well as other productive flies, visit WWW.OnlineFlyFishingGuide.com or go directly to the fly tying pages at WWW.OnlineFlyFishingGuide.com/fly tying




Source by Chris Jackson

Fishing Holidays in the UK – Cottages and Lodges

Most people, including myself, associate Hoseasons with Boating Holidays on places like the Norfolk Broads or on the River Thames,  which I should point out also make fantastic fishing holidays as well. I was pleasantly surprised to find they also have a large range of static holidays in the UK, Channel Islands and some in France. Hoseasons also have a selection of holiday parks on the website which are mainly Caravan types sites - which also have some interesting looking holidays with fishing thrown in.

Everyone's talking about the new light emitting Esca Lures.

Buy these exciting new Esca Lures online at - www.escalure.co.uk

You can search the Hoseasons website in several ways. Firstly you can do a quick search by country and region - England, Scotland, Wales, Channel Islands then by region North, South, East etc. Secondly you can search by types (Parks, Lodges, Cottages, Boats). Unfortunately you cannot search for holidays with fishing. To find the fishing facilities you need to go to the location and click on the Accommodation Info tab to see if fishing is an Accommodation Feature. To see all the sites that have fishing on-site click here. Some of the other locations claim to have fishing nearby, which in some cases is several miles away (which to me defeats the object of a relaxing fishing holiday). Some of the locations indicate fishing with a + sign, which evidently is an extra charge for fishing, which in most cases is no more than £5 per day.

One venue that caught my eye was Woodlakes in Stowbridge, Norfolk which hosts 4 wooden lodges for up to 6 people per lodge. It is situated on 66 acres of beautiful and peaceful countryside around 5 fishing lakes. One of the lakes is a 12 acre Championship lake, which I assume is for match fishing. The lakes are evidently stocked with Carp (up to 40lbs in weight), Roach, Tench, Bream, Rudd, Perch, Pike and Eels (the eels are probably not stocked, as they generally find there own way into lakes). The lodges are named: Cedar Lodge, Cedar Deluxe Lodge, Spruce Lodge and Willow Lodge. They all have TV, Kitchen, Fridge, Microwave, Bath/Shower, Bed Linen, Central Heating facilities.

What I like the look of is the lodges are very close to the lakes, so you can fish virtually from your lodge landing stage. The prices for the lodges range from £272 to £747 depending on the time of year and which lodge you require. As well as fishing Woodlakes is an excellent base for exploring the quaint market towns of King's Lynn, Downham Market, Swaffham and Wisbech. For those of you that like me, need to entertain the family then the famous golden beaches and harbours of the North Norfolk coast, a host of pretty villages, bird sanctuaries and nature reserves are also close at hand.

The Lodges and Cottages on the Hoseasons site also offer great 3 and 4 day deals. If you can go from Monday to Thursday for example you will find the prices reduced quite a bit. Also they do late deals, so if you can wait until the last minute you may get a bargain.

If you are looking for a coarse fishing holiday in the uk where you can go with friends or family and relax, fish and explore in wonderful surroundings, then take a look at the fishing lodges, fishing cottages, caravans and parks that hoseasons have to offer.

At the time of writing this I am in the process of booking a holiday in May at Cedar Lodge for a 4 night break which totals to about £270. I will let you know how I get on.

Summary of "Fishing Holidays in the UK - Cottages and Lodges"Fishing Boots - How To Choose The Perfect Boot

These boots were made for fishing!

Angling has come quite a way over the last decade or two. I remember when the only real choice for footwear when going fishing was a pair of Wellingtons, Doc's, or something ex military. Nowadays, you can't move for ankle boots, low boots, high boots, field boots, high boots, walled boots and even moon boots!

Lots to choose from then, but what points do you need to think about before making your purchase? The main point for consideration should be the type of angling you intend to be doing, and also a crucial factor, the length of your sessions, as this will dictate how long you'll have them on for at a time.

To start off with, let's take a look at what types of footwear are best suited to which types of angling. If you're a stalking, roving or mobile type of angler, you will be better off looking at some of the low cut boots for the majority of your fishing. These will be comfortable for long periods spent walking, and being more like a trainer in design will be much better suited to climbing trees and scrambling down riverbanks. Most low cut boots are waterproof and breathable, but if it's likely you are going to be coming into contact with the water on a regular basis, a slightly higher cut might be more suitable - especially if you won't be doing much climbing.

A good design to look at in such circumstances would be a field boot. A field boot offers a rubberised lower part of the boot, so it's totally waterproof and easy to clean, whilst the upper wall is made of fabric to ensure comfy walking. One thing to look out for, though, is whether the lining is fixed, i.e. stitched in and part of the boot, or removable in that it can be taken out of the boot altogether. Whilst those with a removable liner are great for session fishing, or as a winter boot to keep your feet nice and warm, they aren't too good for trying to walk long distances as the liners - which are often very thick - tend to move around within the boot itself.

An ankle, low, trail or high boot will usually have a fully stitched in liner, so they give you the best of both worlds, good comfort with good traction. It's probably the case that in time you'll get a few different types of footwear to suit the season. My preference for summer is usually a skate type trainer which is quite well protected but allows me to climb trees and stalk comfortably. In the winter I'll tend to be night fishing so will go with a pair of field type fishing boots with a removable liner. In the day, I'll wear them all the time but when in the sleeping bag at night, I'll whip them off and take out the liners. This way I can get them on is a second if the rods go.

For the angler who wants the benefit of comfort, needs to be able to walk good distances, and who will also come into contact with the water quite a bit, you then have the extreme type boot which rides quite a way up the shin. They will be much the same design as the low or ankle boot but, basically, allows you to go into much deeper water without getting your feet wet. Obviously, they are quite big and cumbersome and take quite a bit of lacing up, so they wouldn't be suited to night fishing, but would be ideal for the roving angler in the winter.

It's worth bearing in mind that most angling manufacturers who now offer boots are only taking their lead from the hiking and trail boot industry, and as such, in many cases, you can get just as much bang for your buck - if not more - by purchasing a good hiking or trekking boot from any number of long established brands who have been designing very similar boots for much longer!

Whilst comfort and warmth are usually the main factors people consider, for the session angler, ease of use has to come into it as well. If you're bivvied up on a session the boots are going to be on and off quite a bit, so in such circumstances you might wish to take a look at some of the moon boot styles, which offer good insulating comfort, but have no laces so are much easier to take on and off during the session and during the night.

As a final note, it's worth getting some decent socks at the same time. Good boots are nothing without a good pair of socks to go with them!

Adventurous Holiday Gift Ideas

Christmas time has come around again, which means another round of gift ideas for all of the important people in your life. If you've exhausted all of the traditional shirts, books, jewelry, and jumpers, try out some of these exciting alternatives. No one will expect these 'experience' gifts from you--they are the perfect surprise. No matter the person or people you need to buy for, the right experience is out there. Make a list of your recipients' interests and you'll be sure to hit on the ideal voucher for each.

Everyone's talking about the new light emitting Esca Lures.

Buy these exciting new Esca Lures online at - www.escalure.co.uk

- Hot air balloon ride

A hot air balloon ride is the perfect romantic gift for two. There is nothing more stunning than England from the air, any time of the year. There are many launch locations within easy reach of London. Champagne is a traditional part of ballooning, so for an excellent presentation of your gift buy some bubbly to give along with the voucher.

- Sailing and fishing charters

A chartered sailing or fishing trip to southern climates is the perfect winter escape for the sporting person on your list. Consider the islands off the coast of Africa, or perhaps the coast of South Australia, among other equally appealing options. This gift is sure to be a hit no matter the location chosen. For a fun presentation buy a pair of sunglasses to gift along with a description of their trip.

- Horse riding

There are many horse riding vacations of all sorts offered in the UK and in Europe. Horse riding is a relaxing and fun way to see the scenery in places such as the coast of Iceland, Spain's Andalusia, and Italy's Tuscany. Ride from vineyard to chateau in France's Loire Valley. In the UK the Scottish highlands provide treks among castles and ruins. The ideal location is available to fit the tastes of any equestrian or aspiring equestrian on your list. Try giving them a pair of riding gloves when you announce their gift and its locale.

- Hand gliding

For the truly daring and spontaneous person in your life, try gifting hang gliding lessons. There are many schools in the south of England especially, the perfect location for a chance to hang glide over the beautiful South Downs. South Wales is also a popular hang gliding destination. Give the gift of excitement and adrenaline combined with the tranquility of solo flight. A great way to present your gift could be a map of the UK with your chosen hang gliding school pinpointed.

Commonly Used Fishing Equipments

When you are starting out as a fisherman in the UK, it is best to start with the most simplistic form of fishing equipment. It really doesn't require a lot of fishing gear to go fishing. However, a rod or pole is indeed a necessary piece of equipment. The fishing pole is used to suspend the line from which hangs the bait for the fish. Bamboo, fiberglass and carbon fiber are all basic materials used to make the poles. The fishing rod is used for the same purpose but is somewhat more sophisticated. They have various lengths and also vary in action. The sizes are available from a 24-inch rod to 20 foot one. The casting is better with the longer rod.

There are many different types of fishing rods. A carbon fiber pole is a more technologically advanced pole, which is usually used for coarse fishing in Europe. Fly fishing rods are made to cast artificial flies. They are part of the fishing equipment used to catch salmon in the UK. Many fishermen in the UK use this salmon fishing equipment each year for a successful catch. Normally salmon is fished from the rivers in England, although it can be done well in the sea also. In addition to the right rod, you will need waders for the majority of UK Rivers in order to get to the best fishing places.

When you are searching for sea fishing equipment in the UK, try to find sea rods made to be used on the open sea. These rods will be built stronger and longer than the other kinds. For sharks and other huge game, specialty rods are designed. Be sure that the deep-sea fishing rod that you have selected can hold up to the pressure of the resistant larger fish when they are hooked. Also be certain that it is constructed from material such as fiberglass or graphite, which will resist corrosion from the salt air.

Every other part of your tackle has to be able to fit with your rod. This includes the lines, lures, reels and hooks. If you aren't sure about your choices, get advice from a more experienced fisherman. You need to bear in mind that no matter what kind of fish you are trying to catch in the UK, you have to have the right fishing equipment to be successful.

Seeking Fishing Equipment For Sale

In order to find the right fishing equipment for sale, whether you are a UK fisher or are fishing in another country's waters, it is essential to know what you need. Many hunting and fishing equipment shops worldwide are stocked with quality, brand name supplies. You can fish or you can be a fisherman. An amateur fisher can make a fishing pole, but he shouldn't necessarily expect fish successfully with it.

Most stores that sell fishing supplies have expensive and cheap products. You can purchase fishing supplies such as rods and reels from about seven to thirty five pounds. You need a rod and reel that enables you to catch different size fish. Sporting goods stores sell spin fishing equipment and fly fishing equipment. They sell rods, reels, wholesale fishing tackle, fishing knives and accessories like hooks, bobbers, sinkers, swivels and bait. A person would choose different fishing supplies for small lake and river fishing than for sea fishing. At these stores, you can get tools and supplies for every kind of fishing including ice fishing.

When you are looking for fishing equipment, also consider the boat you may be using and pay some attention to what you will be wearing. Is your trip going to be a long one lasting for days on end or a short simple same-day fishing trip? You need clothing for keeping you the warmest and the driest that you can be and you need the proper boat and boating supplies for the waters in which you plan to fish. You need to look at several different stores in order to be content with the products you purchase. Sometimes, you can find discounts on equipment for sale for freshwater and saltwater fishing, if you buy your fishing gear in bulk.

It would be smart to find a reputable store that has been in business for a while. You can get detailed facts from reviews and information online or you can visit a shop and see for yourself. Compare prices as well as product quality and always opt for a business that will stand behind their supplies. It also matters what kind of service you receive. How did the employees treat you? Were the items easily accessible? Was the store clean and orderly? It is true for UK fishing shoppers and those in other countries: you can find the right fishing equipment for sale if you know how to look for it.

Find the best and the cheapest fishing tackle here at www.innovativefishingtackle.co.uk




Source by Escalure Fishing Tackle

Homemade Carp Bait Recipes And Secrets Of Salts To Improve All Your Fishing Baits!

Why do carp like salt? How and why does using salt, and substances rich in mineral salts improve your catches? I have fished in rivers where the saline conditions mean that bass, flounder as well as carp and eels all thrive to the surprise of many anglers. There is far more to carp and their needs, their reactions and feeding responses to salts in all forms of baits (including boilies and pastes!) Here are many expert answers plus exciting suggestions that will make you think and catch you more fish!

Salts are highly attractive to carp; they are highly ionic, so attract water. For example one example of this property is when you leave salt in air and it cakes. This entire point is extremely significant to optimised bait function!

Most people think of common table salt as salt, but there are many forms and combinations that we can exploit to catch more fish! (Note that chlorine for example is highly reactive; think hard about this point because making baits reactive is highly beneficial to your results!) Sodium and chloride ions are required by all known life in minimal qualities, so instinctively carp are drawn to salty substances.

Technically I'm not sure you term them feeding triggers, as much as they are incitants and bait enhancers in many ways, but they are a powerful signal when in solution in water; inducing much further investigation by fish that's for sure! For example, a fishmeal and marine spod mix is certainly boosted by additional salts and salty substances (compared to adding none.) In my experience fish tend to feed in a more measured more leisurely prolonged mode with added salts, in contrast to certain other additives which can lead to a frenzy of short-lived extremely hard feeding. Of course both approaches can be utilized, and combined together.

Throw lumps of rock salt in the water and carp are sure to investigate. Remember that natural river and lake waters are composed of dissolved minerals, including salts. Some of these essential minerals are even absorbed directly into fish via their skin. Minerals range from pure elements to simple salts etc, and carp respond to endless forms of them for many wide ranging reasons, not merely connected with essential nutritional requirements.

Notice the different taste of table salt compared to sea salt or rock salt. I am certainly not suggesting our taste, smell or perceptions of palatability and depth and richness of profile etc is identical to carp (different brain and nervous wiring and conjunctions etc but you'll notice quite a significant difference! Rock and sea salt is far richer due to the range of minerals and traces etc it contains; and is far more palatable to carp and far more potent as an enhancer in baits! It's another reason I avoid using refined table salt, although if I have nothing else I use it in ground baits for instance, but it means the bait will be under-optimised!

Most rock salt products are derived from dry deposits of ancient seas that dried up, but the funny thing is that the underlying bedrock of lakes, even clay lining lakes that hold the water, are mineral rich and influence the potential of life and growth rates of particular carp waters. I find Rainbow Lake in France fascinating not merely for the range of carp strains stocked and their phenomenal growth rates, but wonder if the carbon naturally in the underlying lake bed is a significant factor too, combined with the silicate (mineral), sandy nature of the lake bed; I'm sure it all connects.

In a funny kind of way it is ironic that the calcium and phosphate that fish absorb through their skin in solution in water, (and consume in their foods) has ended up in their water due to ancient animals biomineralising (producing minerals biologically,) to produce hard structures. For example chitin in shells of mollusks and crustaceans for instance; which when they die then form phosphate and carbonate salts of calcium, deposits laid down under ancient sea beds over eons, so forming carbonate base rock like chalk and limestone rocks beneath or surrounding lakes and rivers etc.

Eventually these minerals are transferred into lake water by natural processes over time, and then they become part of fish. For example the vital collagen connective tissues and bones etc! Everything is connected; fish and humans really are what we eat! (And of course ultimately, ancient teleost fish of which modern carp are part are our long-lost ancestors so we share many common processes and features that we can exploit, that we can relate to our own food to use within our fishing baits, to make catching carp easier!)

On a different note, dissolved minerals, salts in solution (in water) mean that carp are swimming within an electricity-conducting electrolyte. This is very significant indeed because for one thing, the power of many bait substances can be enhanced by exploiting natural carp sensitivities to minerals and mineral salts, either in supplemental forms or as intrinsic parts of natural foods.

We well know that carp are seriously stimulated by pre-digested or hydrolysed ingredients and additives in dry or liquid forms of many kinds containing many salts forms in the chemical reactions involved. It is my belief that because carp are so sensitive to subtle electrical fields, that this is all part of the impacts of baits that can further be manipulated and exploited, and use of salts can obviously a part of this approach to make baits far more easily detected. It might be suggested that you can make your baits more of a noticeable highly subtle electrical energy battery. Personally I am certain that carp detect fields around the area of baits which are far from limited to merely conventional electric or electromagnetic energies.

Carp certainly are just as sensitive and curious to differences in within the water that they detect as to instinctively responding to any arbitrary nutritional signals. For example, a localized change in salinity might well be good cause for investigation, besides the presence of any particular concentrated substance issuing forth from your baits. Of course, fish meal and other marine based baits, predigested additive-rich baits for example can be rich in salts and be significantly salty, intrinsically enhancing and improving bait performance. However, these things can be boosted in many ways using salts and salty substances and their special reactions with a range of bait substances.

I think the reaction between salts and for example alcohol flavours, organic acids, and other things like citric acid, or acetic acid in vinegar (the fermentation of ethanol is used to produce vinegar), and many various other examples, are all highly important reactions within baits and in solution in regards to salts. I'm sure such things are very significant in terms of us being able to on purpose create heightened impacts at carp receptor sites in sensory zones, such as the skin, throat, barbels, lips, palatial area inside the mouth etc that make carp even more enthusiastic for our fishing baits!

Certain saturated carboxylic acids are certainly some of the secret components in more than just a few highly successful commercial bait company products. Anyway you can get an idea here of the fact that experimenting with salts, salty substances and flavours for instance can really pay off big-time in enhancing your catch results!

Do not forget that any boilie base mix can be adapted for use as the base for a specialised ground bait mix, a spod or stick mix, or even used to impart properties and additional stimulation when preparing hemp and sweetcorn and tiger nuts and luncheon meat etc. I am always looking for more information about salts, even in dog and cat food in soft and hard foods.

The presence of additional salt added in the manufacture of Marmite is intriguing as are the salts in yeasts in many formats and formats, including within the classic carp bait additive Phillips Yeast Mixture. Phillips Yeast Mixtures and also very many liquid tonics and so on and other powder or crystalline substances used to improve pet bird, dog and cat health can be exceptionally rich in stimulatory mineral salts etc and for years I have done loads of research on this whole area of bait substances for inclusion in my ebooks.

Salt-rich additives and ingredients are incredibly potent for catching carp and work synergistically (in combination) with other material you have within your baits, from the carbohydrate and protein ingredients in your baits, to liquid foods, flavours and even other enhancers and sweeteners. Thinking about it, for what purposes are salty things like Belachan, yeast extract and soy sauce used for when added to other foods? Enhancing and enriching the sensory impacts and duration of impacts of foods; salty substances are extremely well proven to improve palatability. Carp baits and human foods can be improved by the use of salty substances and salt-related reactions of many kinds.

Include squid extract containing bile salts for example, fermented shrimp powder, other fermented products including miso and soy sauce, other fermented protein-rich materials such as Belachan, yeast extract, seaweeds like kelp products in powder, granules and liquid complexes. This enhancer does not upset insulin release unlike MSG which is harmful in many ways including internal bleeding on a cellular level in the brain.

Many people feel ill after consuming MSG, and indeed it is the reason for the so called Chinese restaurant syndrome. Yet such is the degree of MSG-producing company cover ups about its true impacts, that few anglers know it is harmful. While chatting with Frank Warwick recently about enhancers etc even he did not appear to realise this at that point in time. Pure MSG is vastly different to naturally-occurring glutamate that carp and humans naturally consume with no harmful side effects!

There has over the years been a gigantic effort by MSG manufacturers including Anjinomoto to not only sell the idea of the fifth taste but to get people to accept MSG and even promote it as a good thing! The result is that now as people are becoming more aware that MSG is a harmful substance food manufacturers are not putting MSG on the ingredients list and use other words and misleading and vague terms including glutamate, or vegetable extract, yeast extract Many alternative taste enhancers are available that do not harm carp! I might add that sea weeds and tomato puree are rich in umami taste components.

The tastes you can exploit in your baits include sweet, sour, bitter and salty as well as savouryness (or umami.) Very many carp baits are bitter yet successful; lots of more acidic concentrated flavours make baits taste bitter. Personally speaking I have had great success with many new unique homemade bait recipes that to me have tasted really bitter, or surprisingly sour.

I used to have the group mentality that appears to promote sweeter or perhaps more salty or savoury tastes of baits I make, but no matter what the taste of a bait is to me (and whether I personally like it or not,) it does not stop fish repeatedly enthusiastically consuming baits I may or may not like!

Carp consume forms of algae as it such an incredibly rich digestible a basic food for survival. But if you have ever taken different forms of algae as a health supplement you will know it is not exactly pleasant to humans and I find it unpalatable and avoid trying to taste it at all!

The fact is that carp nerves are wired up differently to humans; their receptor proteins and receptor site adaptations, degrees of sensitivities and nerve connections with their brains from skin, gut wall, fin face, lateral line etc all differ in very many respects to humans! For an angler to state that carp do not like bitter baits is not especially helpful as this is a confusion of many things on many levels. Even the question of the actual degree of taste of a bait as a whole tasted in the mouth in human alkaline solution, compared to carp tasting bait in solution in neutral or acidic water makes things less clear!

Carp are very sensitive to salinity (salt or mineral salt) changes in solution in the water surrounding them. This is incredibly powerful advantage because like humans, fish need to maintain a certain equilibrium of liquid pressures within their body cells to stay alive and function healthily – note the famous feeding trigger betaine (there are various forms,) is vitally intrinsic in this role too! (You may have heard about isotonic baits…) Being sensitive to salts allows fish such as carp to discern many opportunities and threats in the water. For one thing, although carp can survive in brackish water their sensitivity alerts them to moving into water that is too salty for their bodies to handle. That's one reason why carp are not roaming the seas!

Note that natural calcium chloride is the predominant component of familiar table salt, is essential to carp, but and this is really important, you will do better by supplying carp with fine or coarse sea or rock salt instead, as this supplies a potently stimulating wealth of vital minerals and traces which will turn carp on and raise the nutritional value and attraction of your baits.

I personally highly recommend using coarse crunchy kelp, and fine seaweed powder, plus coarse and fine sea salt for example, together. With salts you only need minimal amounts to make a difference, and use of salts is not strictly limited to adding salt to boilie, stick or other mixes and of course endless carp baits can be enhanced using many sources of salts. Crushed Himalayan rock salt has very highly significant unique properties but there are far more sources of potent salts than just this and sea and other rock salts.

Do not ignore the fact that salts are involved in digestion; this is a very important aspect of baits I know most anglers have yet to really understand and harness within baits. I do not consider that adding salts to baits is the optimum way to exploit salts and in fact having salts being deliberately actively created within baits dynamically through various processes is far more potent, but these are secrets I do not give away for free! Revealed in my unique readymade bait and homemade bait carp and catfish bait secrets ebooks is far more powerful information look up my unique website (Baitbigfish) and see my biography below for details of my ebooks deals right now!

By Tim Richardson.




Source by Tim Richardson

Bahamas Taxi Rates Rules & Regulations -bahamas Activities

Under the Bahamas Road Traffic Act , there are five basic types of Public Transport Vehicles.

1. Taxis
2. Tour Cars
3. Livery Cars
4. Self Drive Cars and Scooters
5. Omnibuses: (a) Public Service Omnibuses
(b) Private Schedule Services Omnibuses
(c) Privately Chartered Services Omnibuses

Taxis

Taxis are licensed for a maximum of 12 persons and may ply for hire at any place in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Taxis may be either cars or minibuses and those operating in Grand Bahama and New Providence are required to have working meters. The fares are set by the Government of The Bahamas. The current fare are levels for New Providence, Grand Bahama and the Family Islands was approved in July 2001.

General Rate: For one to two passengers, the frist 1/4 miles is $3.00. Each additional 1/4 mile is 40 cents. Additional passengers after the first two pay $ 3 per person. No charge for accompanied children under the age of five (5) Zone Rate: Zone rates can be applied to most standard routes on request. These rates are also set by the Government of the Bahamas. They apply to one or two passengers. For each additional passenger,add $3.00

Between Sir Lynden Pindling International Airport (Nassau Intern Airport) and

Cable Beach..............................$15
Downtown.................................$22
Paradise Island...........................$27
South Ocean..............................$17
Montagu Forshore......................$29

Between Cable Beach and:
Downtown................................$12
Paradise Island..........................$17
South Ocean.............................$23

Between Paradise Island and Downtown...... $8.00
A bridge toll is added for routes to Paradise Island and is normally $1- $2 depending on the size of Vechicle that you are traveling in.

Waiting Charge:
Having a taxi wait on you will cost 30 cents per minute.

Baggage Charge: There is no charge for up to two pieces of hand baggage, plus small bags and package carried by each passenger. (a)Each additional piece of regular-sized luggage, 75 cents.
(b)Large duffel bags and boxes $1.00

Tour Cars

Like Taxis, Tour Cars are restricted to 12 passengers and may be either car or minibus. However, they should only be used on a prearranged basis for the carriage of groups, either one tours or for transportations purposes.Tour cars may be hired for sightseeing at $45 per hour, ( Five or fewer persons). For each additional 1/2 hour or part thereof, $22.50, Large cars, $60.00 per hour (up to twelve persons), $30.00 for each additional 1/2 hour.

Livery Cars

Livery Cars are found in New Providence and Grand Bahama. They are pre-booked chauffeur driven cars, rented by the hour or day, and are not permitted to ply for hire.

Self Drive Cars and Scooters:
Self drive Cars and Scooters are rental vehicles.

Omni Buss
There are three categories of Omni Buses

(a) Public Schedule Service Omni Bus - commonly called Jitneys, These are licensed for carriage of individual fares between two points on a set route. The fares range from $1.00 - $2.00. Senior citizens, Pensioners and disabled persons pay 50 cents. Children under 3 years are free

(b) Private Schedule Omni Bus - Used mainly for conveyance of groups such as hotel staff, school children, lodge groups, etc, who move from different locations at schedule times.

(c) Private Chartered Services Omni Bus - Used for conveyance of charter groups on sight seeing tours by charter arrangements occasionally used in place of Tour Cars

According to recent survey done on the Islands of New Providence, Eleuthera and Grand Bahama, Taxis and Jitneys are frequently owner driven. Their operations is thus economic base for a large number of families in the Islands .




Source by Bennett Allan

Deep Sea Fishing at Sea Isle New Jersey

In ever increasing numbers, fishermen from the novice to the experienced are finding the excitement and adventure of deep-sea fishing easily available in the waters off Sea Isle, New Jersey. With almost year-round fishing opportunities, it remains to simply choose the best time to book a boat or charter. Because of the unique cross flows of the Delaware River, the Hudson River, and the Gulf Stream, a nice variety of fish are attracted to this area. Closer in to shore, you can catch blue fish, striped bass, fluke, and weakfish, to name a few, and there are those who choose to surf fish right from the shore lines of selected beaches.

If you really want the opportunity to be out on the water and go where the bigger boys are, you'll want to connect with one of the many fishing boats for hire. You can book 1/2 day, 3/4 day, all day or 23 hour night time trips, depending on what you are hoping to catch and how far you are willing to travel. For many fishermen, the excursion is its own reward. For others, the opportunity to do battle with a giant tuna, a swordfish, or mahi-mahi is a challenge like no other.

Families with children can enjoy and afford ocean fishing. As fishermen know, landing a big fish isn't always about size and strength as much as it is skill and technique. Bluefish usually run up to about 15 pounds, but they do not give in easily. Caught by jigging (dropping un-baited hook and reeling in as fast as possible) or by bait fishing, they will keep even an experienced angler busy. Practiced, professional crews will assist with all aspects, including cleaning and filleting. Bring your own food, beverages, suntan lotion, and of course, a camera to show you with your trophies. You may also want to bring a cooler to store fish that you plan to bring home for a tasty fish fry.

Are you looking for a little more excitement? How about heading out to sea in the late afternoon, catching a few winks in the clean, air-conditioned bunkrooms, and then, sometime around midnight, rising to wage war with the bigger warriors of the deep. In the fall, tuna runs can produce fish anywhere from 25 lbs - 100+ lbs. A tuna is an amazing, unrelenting fighter. It will definitely give you an experience you will always remember. In addition, swordfish have been brought in weighing up to 250 lbs as well as the great tasting mahi-mahi that weighs in at about 20 lbs.

Your fishing experience will last through the night hours until dawn. Coming back to shore is a leisurely boat ride, savoring the recent evening adventures. Be sure to bring a blanket or sleeping bag and pillow. Fishing equipment is rented and bait is provided. Whether you want a family vacation or a weekend away with the guys, deep sea fishing off Sea Isle, New Jersey will offer a unique experience you will remember for years to come.




Source by Stephen A Daniels